Food safety authority warns parents against giving rice milk to young children

The Irish Food Safety Authority warns parents against giving rice milk to young children.

The Food Safety Authority of Ireland advises infants and young children up to four and a half years old not to consume rice milk as a substitute for cow’s milk, breast milk or infant formula.

Previously, the FSAI warned of findings indicating that low levels of inorganic arsenic could be found in rice milk.

In a statement today, he said he was aware of a rice-based infant and follow-on formula available to buy online through a co.uk website.

“These infant formulas are not legally allowed to be sold on the European market, as they do not meet the legal composition and nutrition requirements for infants,” he said.

“The FSAI is in contact with authorities in the UK and other Member States to discontinue the sale of this product in Europe from this website.”

The authority contacted hospitals and public health professionals to inform them of the online sale.

FSAI chief executive Dr Pamela Byrne explained that exposure to inorganic and toxic arsenic should be kept as low as possible.

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“Rice-based infant formulas and follow-on formulas are not legally allowed to be sold on the European market because they do not meet the nutritional requirements of infants,” Dr Byrne said.

“In addition, there are concerns about the inorganic arsenic content of rice products intended for young children. The FSAI is aware of published studies that low levels of inorganic arsenic have been detected in rice milk in the past and the recommendation is that infants and young children up to 4.5 years of age should not be exposed to these products,” she said.

“Arsenic is present in the environment and therefore can be present in a range of foods, including rice, at low levels. The toxicity of arsenic depends on the form in which it occurs. , the latter being organic or inorganic.

The inorganic form is the most toxic form and the FSAI states that exposure to it should be kept as low as reasonably possible.

“As a precautionary measure, to reduce exposure to inorganic arsenic, parents and guardians should not give these foods to infants and young children up to 4.5 years of age.”

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